Education & Society: Logic vs. Creativity

May I ask you, what is your dream job? What are you passionate about?  Does your current job integrate your passions? How about your experience with education? If not, why? I’ve been asking myself this for years. Now it’s been almost twenty years since I graduated high school and I’m doing what I love. However, I’m unable to put in the time that I would like because I have to spend most of my time at the job that pays my bills but is of little interest to me.

Likewise, so many others are experiencing the same ordeal.  More than likely due to our society’s perspective that the only careers worthwhile are those that are money-centric. This indoctrination is present within our current education system and needs to be addressed sooner than later. Fine and performing arts are not credible in the business world and as a result students are taught in school to be more science and business minded. In addition, our country’s financial crisis causes students to attend college acquiring a degree that will lead them to making more money. However, their passion projects are left in the dust and they aren’t as financially prosperous as expected.

That being said, not everyone is unfortunate in this way. Some may excel in the business and logical world. My point is that we are a left brain (logic and reason) dominant society. If our education system embraced both left and right (intuitive and subjective) brain activities as well as diverse styles of learning, students would excel and develop “super learning”. Super learning is the capability to learn and comprehend at a faster rate. Furthermore, I’d like to argue if left and right brain are used equally we’d be more receptive to different styles of learning and career paths. Both hemispheres of our brain should consistently be engaged in order to live our lives at its fullest potential, which by default, our country will thrive as well.

 

Want to learn more on education and society?

Check out G the Rebel and my latest episode of Millennial Logic: Education and Society: Logic vs. Creativity

In addition, here are a couple videos about our education system and creativity as well as, why using 100% of our brain is important.

 

 

 

 

 

Climate Change: Humanity’s Demise?

So truthfully, we all secretly (or for the morbid – openly) ponder what will be the demise of human existence. Climate change is in fact an increasing fear and an 11th hour issue to all animals on Earth. It’s prime time hurricane season and there have already been billions of dollars in damages and lives lost due to hurricane Harvey and Irma. This is not to mention historical wildfires along the west and other natural disasters. There is no time to ignore the reality of climate change. We must act now!

Nevertheless, many of us wonder what we can do on our own to help combat climate change. Similarly, will our collective efforts even work? A favorite organization of the movement, Climate Reality Project, has tons of information on this very topic. Here’s a cool video by Bill Nye the Science Guy explaining the effects of climate change and how to reduce our carbon foot print. Don’t forget to check out Millennial Logic’s episode on this topic as well.

Bill Nye’s Advice:

 

Hurricane Harvey Relief Funds

Here are just a few Hurricane Harvey relief funds we found. Every small step makes a difference. Along with donating, we must put pressure on our local officials. Preparation is key. This is only the beginning of extreme storms. Furthermore, stay positive.

Anything helps!

 

  1. Houston Flood Relief Fund 

Funding organizer by Houston Texan football player JJ Watt

 

2. Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

Funding organizers Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner & County Judge Ed Emmet

 

3. Global Giving

An organization based in Washington, D.C. focusing on bridging the gap between community advocates and donators to those in need around the world.

New Episode of Millennial Logic: A Call for Unity and Action

 

Millennial Logic Episode 8: A Call for Unity and Action

After a brief hiatus, we’ve returned with a brand new episode of Millennial Logic!  We discuss the current political climate in regard to the transition of power. In addition, we provide strategies on how to move forward in sustaining our human rights. Furthermore, one tactic is coming together as a group and organizing. To learn more, tune in and feel free to comment here, Spreaker, or Soundcloud!

The Second Presidential Debate: Hillary Clinton vs. King of Deplorables

The Second Presidential Debate: Hillary Clinton vs. King of the Deplorables

Porsche and G the Rebel present their perspective on the second presidential debate. Overall it was ineffective, a hot mess and uncomfortable. Don’t forget to check out our website: www.msmovement.org Now on iTunes!!! https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/millennial-logic/id1164552133?mt=2 G the Rebel youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyWDSPAdInC9SZnEYHWCO7A Credit to NPR Fact Checker: http://www.npr.org/2016/10/09/497056227/fact-check-clinton-and-trump-debate-for-the-second-time

G the Rebel and Porsche discuss how ineffective the second debate turned out to be. We want to know more in regard to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump’s policy! Election day is less than a month away!!

The First Presidential Debate: Hillary vs. ?

The First Presidential Debate: Hillary vs. ?

G the Rebel and Porsche present their analysis on the candidates’ response to each topic addressed in the first debate.

 

Yay first official podcast episode…here we go! Hillary vs. ? Girado and I discuss our analysis on what went down in the first debate. Still unsure of who the hell Donald Trump is and who he represents (hence ?). Enjoy Friends!

Introducing Millennial Logic!

We are proud to introduce our long-awaited podcast, Millennial Logic!

G the Rebel and I discuss various topics in regard to social injustice and current events. Check out our intro episode down below or soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/millennial_logic). Don’t forget to watch the first presidential debate tonight on CNN at 9 pm (ET)/ 6 pm (PT) and tune in for our analysis later this week!

 

Millennial Logic 101

Co-hosts Porsche and G The Rebel introduce Millennial Logic.

 

Governing Gone Bad

There appears to be a trend within our generation in regard to the perception of the US government, local, state and federal. It goes without saying that we feel like we can’t trust our government. Recall annual tax season and dreadful mandatory visits to the DMV, we’d rather not bother with it. This has been on my mind for quite some time but recently I was having a conversation with some friends about immigration. Among all of us we could not fathom why it’s so hard to gain citizenship in this country. Especially since this country was built on the back of immigrants. I couldn’t help to notice that a few of my friends chose to shutdown, blame the government and refuse to have anything to do with it. Comments were made such as, “the government is terrible” and “this is why I don’t vote”. While I am able to empathize with these opinions, I feel this way of thinking is not very helpful to the progression of our society.

My point is as much as we don’t want to have anything to do with our government, we can’t just throw our hands up and turn the other way. If we are truly fed up, we must fight fire with fire and revolutionize. We are the generation to lead the world to social justice as long as we stay motivated. That being said, how can we do this and what makes a government great at their job?

 

The Importance of Local/State Government

Check out Good Governance Guide to read detailed information on the characteristics and methods of a good government. While this in fact is an Australian based website, I believe the ideas presented are useful for any governed nation. The key points associated with good governance are: (1) transparency within the policy process and (2) legislation must be created with the wellbeing of the most vulnerable in the community in consideration. In order for us as a community to ensure that our local, state and federal government are practicing good policy we need to be aware of who we place in office and be more present in general. With this in mind, I want to present two examples that demonstrate poor public policy and our inability to participate in the political process. Here’s governing gone bad:

  1. Bobby Jindal’s Louisiana Purchase

In 2008, Bobby Jindal was sworn into office as the governor of Louisiana. At that point in time, Louisiana had a surplus of $1 billion and by the end of Jindal’s two terms, Louisiana’s economy is at a $1.6 billion deficit. It is so bad that Jindal’s successor, John Bel Edwards (democrat), came forth with a public service announcement (video below) expressing how detrimental this situation is. A lot of public services may be defunded and not available. What gets me the most is the possible shut down of state universities and colleges. Children and young adults are paying the price of Jindal’s financial irresponsibility. Jindal gets to leave office while the state and the people are left suffering and scurrying to find ways to alleviate this problem. Furthermore, I was surprised that while researching this particular issue there was not a lot of information out there. You would think this epidemic would be everywhere being that Jindal attempted to run for president.

 

  1. Flint Michigan – The Water

Here’s how Flint’s water crisis happened – CNN Video

CNN’s Sara Ganim explains the story behind the water crisis in Flint, Michigan.

I cannot begin to express how devastating the Flint water crisis is. The people should be able to trust their local/state government when it comes to the basic necessities of life. Unfortunately, in Genesee county, Michigan it is not the case. Due to lack of transparency and the inability of the local and state government to inform their residents of possible contaminants within the water, families are suffering throughout the county. In addition, the government officials absolutely disregarded the wellbeing of the most vulnerable people in the city, that being children (6,000-12,000 exposed). The state’s decisions will affect these people for the rest of their lives.

I will briefly explain the aspects surrounding the crisis, likewise, I will provide links with more detailed information. The water crisis in Flint, MI is a contamination of “treated” water. The city of Flint changed their water source from Detroit Water and Sewage Department (DWSD) to Flint River. The water tested at the Flint Water Plant showed acceptable low levels of contamination. However, once the water traveled through the pipes into homes and buildings the water was in fact contaminated due to corrosion within the pipes which caused lead to leak into the water. This began as early as April 2014. Flint returned to DWSD as a water source in October 2015, however so many residents have been affected that Michigan has been in a state of emergency since January 5, 2016. Naturally, the people have a right to know who’s responsible and hold them accountable. This is an on-going investigation and thus far, four government officials have resigned and one has been fired.

 

To sum this up, it’s important to point out that both governors, Snyder and Jindal, attempted to save money without taking into consideration the impact it would have on their community. In fact, these poor choices resulted in the state having to spend even more money, as well as asking the federal government to bail them out. Furthermore, this is an eye-opener to the fact that we were right about not trusting our government and with this in mind we should not look the other way but in fact be present within the governmental process.

We can do this by participating in town hall meetings, visiting our local public office and just by simply doing research on our community leaders. In addition, some local offices have incorporated online participation in the form of public opinion surveys and live web-streamed meetings for our convenience. Here is a link to retrieve contact information for state and local government.

Donate!

Flint Michigan:

HELP for FLINT

Community Foundation of Greater Flint

Louisiana:

Help Louisiana GoFundMe

 

Beyonce’s Truth in Black America

 

 

I’m a little late in the game in reference to Beyoncé’s latest video/song/super bowl performance and am still a bit confused about all the political uproar. Firstly, as a black female (with quite a bit of creole in my ancestry), watching this video and listening to the lyrics does provide me with a sense of empowerment, but not in the way some political analyst like Tomi Lahren and former NY mayor Rudy Giuliani are assuming. That is, I don’t want to go out and be violent towards police officers and I feel that I can speak for quite a few other black Beyoncé stans as well. That being said, Formation makes me feel good in my own skin and zealous about my heritage. What’s wrong with that?

 

According to Lahren:

Tomi Lahren is a political analyst for The Blaze, who was offended by Beyoncé and her dancers performing in outfits similar to the Black Panther Party (BPP). She feels that Beyoncé was “saluting a group known for violence and intimidation.” She also repeatedly brings up Martin Luther King Jr. as someone who Beyoncé should have saluted in order to push her political agenda. Furthermore, Lahrin also blames Obama, Jada Pinkett-Smith and Al Sharpton for not letting “America heal” and continuously “ripping off the historical band-aid”. Lahrin reminds Beyoncé that white girls as well as black girls want to be like her, so basically she shouldn’t speak up for her race in fear of alienating white people.

 

MSM rebuttal:

  1. On Black Panther Party affiliated costumes and salutation

Okay, yes, Beyoncé and her dancers channeled the BPP via wardrobe but not once in her song/performance did she urge violence against police officers or any other group of people. While watching her performance, as a black person, I never felt the urge to be violent towards anyone. Why are you planting this seed? Are you threatened by clothing?

 

  1. On MLK Jr. reference

By all means, I respect MLK Jr. and he is a very important figure within American and African American history but I am agitated with how he has become the token black figure for white people. This is my personal opinion and I feel that white people gravitate to him because he was relatively non-threatening, somewhat of a black Gandhi. That being said, you can’t tell us who we can and cannot relate to. If we want to reference BPP then so be it. As long as we aren’t being violent, it shouldn’t be a problem. Who are you to tell us that we can’t look up to important figures within our history.

FYI: BPP began its agenda with helping out the youth in the black communities via education, food banks, health services etc. in hopes to relieve disparities within their communities and eliminate police brutality. The party wasn’t associated with violence until they grew frustrated with the un-resolving issue of police brutality. They took it upon themselves to police the police, thoroughly learning various laws (specifically gun laws) and exercising their rights. Of course, police felt threatened and the rest is history. I’m not condoning violence by any means, I’m just presenting facts. My point is Lahren don’t be so quick to jump to conclusions about a super bowl performance.

 

  1. On Obama and friends not letting “America heal”

Cry me a river girl. It is what it is. Racism, classism, all the isms for that matter aren’t history. It is happening right now. I’m sorry you don’t want to hear about it. I’m sorry you can’t stay comfortable in your privilege. First, you’re upset Beyoncé visually referenced BPP because you feel that it’s promoting violence but then you criticize black leaders who are peaceful. I don’t know what you want from us. If you don’t want to hear about these issues, then do something to help resolve the problem because guess what, we won’t be silenced for your comfort.

 

MSM conclusion:

All in all, this is so tiring and I try not to put much effort in responding to ignorant accusations such as Tomi Lahren’s; but her comments happened to trigger something for me and I had to address it. Personally, this hit a soft spot for me because Beyoncé is and has been a woman I admire and I know several others who feel the same. Being a black feminist, her music/artistry has inspired me for years. Her art empowers me to feel good about myself and work hard in order to be successful in whatever makes me happy. How dare anyone try and take that away just because they can’t relate to her message. That being said, don’t make an issue out of nothing.